Reasons to Consider Adopting a Senior Dog

 

If you’re thinking about adding a four-legged member to your family, why not adopt an older dog? Pups that have a bit of gray in their fur could be a better match for you and your lifestyle, and you may like the fact that they don’t require as much of an investment as newborn pups. Here’s a quick rundown of why an older dog could be the perfect choice for you and your household.

They’re Housebroken

Maybe you aren’t home as much as you may like, which could mean that you’ll come home to an unsightly smell and sight courtesy of your new puppy with a small bladder and no training. Depending on the shelter or the previous owner, a senior dog is more likely to be trained to wait before going to the bathroom. Just make sure you visit vet products direct for dog worming tablets to keep your older dog in the best health possible.

You Know What You’re Getting

Some people like a specific breed of dog. If you’re in this boat, you may seek out a certain puppy to adopt. Imagine taking the puppy home thinking it’s one breed only to discover that it’s something completely different, which can have far-reaching consequences if you have a small space and a big dog that was advertised as a little terrier. By adopting a senior dog, you know exactly what you’ll be bringing home.

They’re Fine on Their Own

Sometimes puppies require more attention than you may always be willing to give, but that’s usually not the case with older dogs. Over time, they’ve learned how to amuse themselves when you aren’t around, which means there’s less chance of you coming home to toilet paper strewn all over the living room or blinds that have been chewed up.

You Could Be Saving Its Life

Because most hopeful dog owners want cute puppies, they may overlook the older dogs, which means shelters could have more senior dogs than they know what to do with, something that can result in those dogs being put down. By giving a senior dog a home, you just may be saving her or his life while improving yours.

Fewer (Hopefully) Trips to the Vet

Just like a newborn baby needs several trips to the pediatrician, the same is true of newborn puppies. And just like with a baby, all those trips to the vet can seriously add up over time. Senior dogs at a shelter are often current on their shots, have been altered and are on a preventative, making caring for them less expensive and time-consuming.

There’s a Better Chance of Finding the Perfect Match

Going back to the dog’s breed, you also know a senior dog’s disposition before taking her or him home with you. While an older dog may not be the most rambunctious in the pack, some of them can make great hiking and activity buddies if that’s what you want in a dog. On the other hand, maybe you’d rather have a more docile dog who’s just as content to relax around the house on the weekends as you are. No matter your preference, you’re more likely to find just what you want by going with an older dog.

They’ve Got a Lot of Love to Give

While most dogs are quite affectionate, older dogs have a special type of love to offer. They may have been given to a shelter, had their last owner pass away, or have been dumped in the middle of nowhere. When you adopt them, they have another chance to have a forever home and enjoy the companionship of a new owner. Senior dogs are sure to love you just as much as you love them, maybe even more.

Before heading straight for the newborn puppies the next time you’re at the shelter, ask to see the older dogs first. Don’t let the gray fur keep you from making a new best friend.

 

Reasons to Consider Adopting a Senior Dog